HAE HAWAIʻI DAY FITSTRIKE RELEASE: SLAPS WIND 59FIFTY, SNAPBACK, & STRAPBACK, & RALLY ‘ROUND TEE

Posted in Updates on July 30th, 2019 by FITTED

Released exclusively in-store and online today, July 30 at 11am HST.

OPIO

Photo: @Jomboy808
ʻŌpio: @tuhi.the.dragon, @kaulanapao, & @loadingusername.__

Aloha kākou!

In these days, at this precise time, as we struggle to make sense of what it looks and feels like to be Hawaiian, we are reminded of what Aloha is. Aloha Lani, Aloha ʻĀina, Aloha Wai, Aloha Kai, and Aloha Kanaka. It is with these ʻōpio our best work will make sense. Every step, every lesson, every hand makes a difference, so while we hold space until they are ready we must do OUR very best to ALOHA. It is the highest form of respect and excellence to honor the things that where here before us. Through this reciprocation things are balanced.

#maunakea #hookanaka #oipo #uluaulu

 

Tomorrow is Hae Hawaiʻi Day, and to acknowledge its significance, we wanted to delve deep into the history of our flag, as explained by FITTED co-owner Ola Rapozo below.

We also have a new release today featuring three Slaps Wind caps in the same clean black base, traditional flag colors, and white crest, utilizing different New Era silhouettes: 59FIFTY fitted, 9FIFTY snapback, and 9TWENTY curved visor strapback. Along with the three caps, we are also releasing a yellow Rally ‘Round tee, featuring Hae Hawaiʻi placed in a rotating pattern, inspired by the protest quilts created during the forced imprisonment of Queen Liliʻuokalani.

HAE HAWAIʻI
In 1793 a British’s Naval captain named George Vancouver Gifts Kamehameha Ekahi a red ensign. Vancouver writes in his journal that he was “agreeably surprised in finding that his riper years had softened that stern ferocity, which his younger days had exhibited, and had changed his general deportment to an address characteristic of an open, cheerful, and sensible mind; combined with great generosity, and goodness of disposition.” They met and talked about the cession of Ko Hawaiʻi Pae ʻĀina to the British in exchange for full Autonomy. The meeting ended with the exchange of gifts, with Kamehameha presenting four feathered helmets and other items, while Vancouver gave Kamehameha the remaining livestock on board, “five cows, two ewes and a ram.” The British flag given by Vancouver was flown until 1816.

In 1816, Kamehameha commissioned a flag of their own to be produced. Some conflict is debated as to who it was designed by but credit is given to Alexander Adams a Scotsman who served in the British Royal Navy and English Captian by the name of George Charles Beckley. Hae Hawaiʻi intended to represent a neutral Sovereign nation. The design was a combination of the British Union Jack along with 8 alternating white, red and blue stripes to represent each of the islands. Side note, I have read that 7 stripes were also designed but not much other evidence of this exists.

In February of 1817, Kamehameha sent the boat Forester (later renamed Kaʻahumanu) loaded with ʻiliahi to Canton China to sell. While pulling into the harbor, the crew experienced a Harbormaster for the first time and the inexperienced crew was hit with heavy taxes and was forced to offload the ʻiliahi at a heavy loss. They thought that the flag given to them by Vancouver and the alliance with Britain would be recognized by the international trade community. But alas, although the event stung Kamehameha, he learned valuable lessons.

Much discussion was had about the Kanaka Maoli flag and its origin. One source states that this flag existed and was Kamehamehaʻs personal flag. A story written in the Honolulu Advertiser in 2001 claims that the flag was a resurrection after it was destroyed in 1843 by Naval Officer Lord Paulet. He is best known for seizing the Hawaiian kingdom in the name of the British Government for 5 months. The man who made this claim said he met a descendant of Paulet on the grounds of ʻIolani Palace in 1999 an was told the current flag is not the original Hawaiian flag. He then scoured the State Archives where he claims he found the design and reproduced it. The design is said to be a fresh non-colonial symbol of the restored Hawaiian Kingdom. The issue that some historians have with this is the date of the Paulet affair in 1843. Numerous ship logs noted that many foreign vessels visiting Hawaiʻi since 1816 puts eyes on the Hae Hawaiʻi. Also, there are two portraits painted around 1819 of Kalanimokuʻs baptism after the death of Kamehameha.

Whether you subscribe to the original Hae Hawaiʻi flag or the Kanaka Maoli Flag, I believe one thing is undisputed. The pride and love given by all who stand under are unbridled. Our people are activated with a renewed vigor, to self determine and restore the years of persecution and disrespect. We are native indigenous people of this land and for too long have been marginalized. “ONIPAʻA KAKOU”

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