PAIR A DICE x ALOHA SERVED DAILY (PRIVATE LABEL)

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009 by

Releasing this Saturday, November 21st.

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With Christmas rapidly approaching us around the corner, we’ve shifted our seasonal focus on just that: the winter season, while keeping the Hawaiiana culture intact. And while many upstarts and well established companies are clearly out there exploiting Hawaiian culture, traditions and customs just to make a quick buck, we’re sitting back and shaking our heads. Without knowing, at first glance, it would look as if we’re doing the same; but if one looks further, you would realize that we’re educating as opposed to exploitation. “The proof is in the poi.” But you already knew that.

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WEB EXCLUSIVE: BURN EXCLUSIVE & HILLSIDE GIANTS

Monday, November 16th, 2009 by

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WEB EXCLUSIVE: DUCK BLACK KAMEHAMEHA, LONG BEACH 49ERS, ORIGINAL & REIGN SUPREME

Friday, November 13th, 2009 by

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CHEEHUU!

Thursday, November 12th, 2009 by

Releasing Saturday, November 14th.

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Shaka value. You can never have too many shaka’s thrown about; the shaka is the new “peace sign.” The Honolulu Star Bulletin ran an article back in 2002 about the possible origin of the infamous “shaka,” and according to one legend, a man named Hamana Kalili of Laie whom once held a position at the Kahuku Sugar Mill, lost three of his fingers while feeding the sugar cane into a rolling-machine which turned the sugar cane stalks into sugar “juice.” Due to that accident, he had to leave the sugar mill and eventually picked a job up as a security guard on the “sugar train” which traveled between Sunset Beach and Ka’a’awa. “One of his jobs was to keep all the kids off the train,” says Vonn Logan, Kalili’s grandnephew. “All the kids would try to jump the train to ride from town to town. So they started signaling each other. Since (Kalili) lost his fingers, the perfect signal was what we have now as the ‘shaka sign.’ That’s how you signaled the way was clear.” So there you have it, the story of the origin of the “shaka sign.” As far as the word, it’s still pretty unclear where that originated.

This Saturday, we’re releasing a woven-straw hat featuring that infamous shaka that even Obama threw up during his inauguration. The shaka, in raised white stitching rests on the front of the cap, contrasted with an orange top button, green New Era sign and both green and lighter shade of green on the underbill which creates a tri-lock pattern, also seen on the satin lining on the inside. Backside features the crest in raised stitching; green with a white stroke. Per normal, these are sure to fly off the shelves, so be well prepared!

NOW ONLINE: MABUHAY SERVED DAILY

Saturday, November 7th, 2009 by

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MABUHAY SERVED DAILY

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009 by

Releasing Saturday, November 7th.

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Proceeds from this release will be going toward the relief effort in the Philippines.

Mabuhay (pronunciation: mah-BOO-high) is a form of expression comparable to our Aloha and used to convey a simple “Hello” and/or “Goodbye.” It embraces the same soul as our Aloha spirit, and it’s heard pretty much everywhere you travel around the Philippines; from the first steps off the airplane to the entrance in your hotel room. Being that Hawaii’s population is comprised of nearly 55% of Asians (according to a 2009 census), and out of that 55%, nearly 23% are made up of Filipinos; almost half of the Asian population are Filipino. We wanted to pay respects to the Filipinos who have helped influence our local foods, culture, languages (pidgin) and the amazing work ethics of this proud people.

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PLEASE KOKUA: ART SHOW x FUNDRAISER @ BLACK CAT STUDIO THIS FRIDAY

Monday, November 2nd, 2009 by

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Editor’s note: Hawaii Bone Marrow Donor Registry will have a booth inside of Black Cat Tattoo studio, so when you come through, take a few minutes to register. It could potentially save a life!

This Friday (Nov. 6th), Black Cat Tattoo Studio and Art Gallery of Chinatown, Honolulu will present The Awakening, the first collaboration of internationally recognized artists Andy King and Basil Sakamoto. Though the well-known duo practices in different media – oil painting and graphic design, respectively – their visions reflect a shared theme of cultural awareness and representation.

The event goes down this Friday, which is also First Fridays in Chinatown. This art exhibition is also a fundraising event for Kenneth Brimer, in support of his recent diagnosis of Chronic Lymphotic Leukemia. Please come down and check out the great art that will be on display. There will be a live DJ plus cocktails served all night. Proceeds from the few art pieces being sold that night will benefit Kenny Brimer. Also, please note that Black Cat Studio will be offering “tattoo for Kenny.” Proceeds from this will help with medical expenses and traveling to the mainland for procedures. When booking a tattoo appointment, please mention that you are supporting Kenny.

Black Cat Studio is on 1157 Bethel St. across from Mark’s Garage, next to JJ Dolans. (808) 524-7580.

DIZ GIBRAN – TRULY YOURS (FEAT. BJ THE CHICAGO KID)

Monday, November 2nd, 2009 by

QUICKSAND

Monday, November 2nd, 2009 by

Releasing tomorrow, Tuesday (11/03).

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‘Til this day, the story behind whether Captain Cook was first revered by the royal family (the native Hawaiian’s naively believed Cook to be a transmigration of the soul in the form of Lono, the God of War), then eventually killed when it was learned that Cook was indeed mortal, is still highly debated by native Hawaiian scholars, historians and anthropologists. What is known is the bad seeds that were planted during his visit and short-lived stay; sexually transmitted diseases, mosquitoes and other epidemics, as well as communal diseases that spread through the social lives of the native Hawaiians, including prostitution and a heavy case of disillusion. This eventually led to many social and economic changes that we all still suffer from up until today. The blood that spilled onto the land and into the water that day may never cover up the fact that we were ultimately plagued with these biological and social diseases that Cook and his crew planted here, but it’s a strong reminder that the bearer of those bad seeds ceases to exist and can no longer sprout his immoral and detrimental fruit.

The t-shirt illustrates the final moment of Cook’s life on the front of the tee. The back features a red crown. The hat pictured above is a Milwaukee Brewers (Cooperstown), a logo rarely seen these days. The hat features yellow eyelets, red button and green “Milwaukee M” logo.